Christianity and the New Spirit of Capitalism // Kathryn Tanner.

What has Wall Street to do with Jerusalem? What has the stock exchange to do with the Great Exchange? What has economics, specifically finance-dominated capitalism (FDC), to do with Christianity? Well, when the stakes are this high, a whole lot. Lives and the very fabrics of societies are being undone at the seams by theContinue reading “Christianity and the New Spirit of Capitalism // Kathryn Tanner.”

Systematic Theology Volume 1 // Katherine Sonderegger.

Many theology books are instructive, some delightful, and a few inspiring, but precious rare ones set a fire so deep within that it both burns me thoroughly and is impossible put out. Katherine Sonderegger’s Systematic Theology Volume 1 is such fire. “Theology awakens a grateful heart.” (vii) This is particularly true of Katherine Sonderegger’s firstContinue reading “Systematic Theology Volume 1 // Katherine Sonderegger.”

Theology and the End of Doctrine // Christine Helmer.

In 1984, George Lindbeck, professor of theology at Yale University, published The Nature of Doctrine, a short manifesto that succinctly summarized a new way of doing theology: the so called “postliberal theology.” The proposal is simple: theological formation is best modeled after cultural-linguistic development. In other words, learning theology is like learning a language: oneContinue reading “Theology and the End of Doctrine // Christine Helmer.”

Theology: Luxury, Tool, or Worship?

As I’ve been encouraged to envision myself as a theologian, a common question arises: “What does a theologian do?” A tempting response would be: “a theologian theologizes theology.” It has just the right amount of obscurity and tongue-in-cheek wordplay that hints both the elitism and self-delusion so often criticized of the theological academia. Instead, aContinue reading “Theology: Luxury, Tool, or Worship?”

The Drama of Doctrine // Kevin J. Vanhoozer.

During Kevin J. Vanhoozer’s itinerant time at Wheaton, word of this book, his magnum opus, was buzzed as the book to read for eager students of theology. So, desperately wanting to learn more, I bought the book, read the first few pages, and closed the book. I thought, “What in God’s name is he talking about?” His verbosity dwindledContinue reading “The Drama of Doctrine // Kevin J. Vanhoozer.”